My 5 Links

This was an initiative started by Egichomo here. You simply post five links to certain posts as done below then tag about  five bloggers to do the same. Here goes:

Most Popular Post: Why a Kenyan Revolution will Never Happen

This post was written a few days before February 28th. If we can all remember, The Arab revolution was sweeping through countries such as Tunisia and Egypt. Back home, people sort to come up with something that would make Kenyans stand up and tell the political elite that enough was enough. February 28th was chosen as the day in which we would sing the national anthem at 1PM. This post by cdooh sort to explain why a Kenyan revolution would never happen. As we speak, I do not know what became of the Kenya Feb 28th initiative, but I suppose, as a country, we have had to address other more pressing issues.

Post That Did Not Get The Attention It Deserved: The Journey

This is a poem by beenduta. I leave it to you to interpret it as you deem fit.

Post Whose Success Surprised Me: Review: Twitter App LMAO!

This is a review of the twitter API LMAO! that was made by Amasy. The reason why it’s success was such a surprise is because the person who wrote the post, greatrnk, is not such a tech person. As a result, the review was more of an ordinary review rather than a technical one.

Most Controversial Post: The Unspoken Rules of The ‘Kalocal’

This is not a controversial post, since there has not been one written here yet. However, I believe this post by Deestinguished will win if a poll of the most controversial post is done. This is a post which gives some rules on how to conduct ourselves when visiting our various ‘kalocal’

Post I Am Proud Of: Martha aka Thatcher Karua: Is Change Here?

This was the very first post on this blog. It was written by Justalffie just after Mike Sonko and Kabogo had been elected Members of Parliament in by-elections.

I tag the following (who are more than five. Rules are made to be broken!)

Cdooh who blogs at Private Thoughts of A Young Kenyan

Greatrnk who blogs at The Greatrnk

Justalffie who blogs at In His Mind

Deestinguished who blogs at Life In Paragraphs

Beenduta who blogs at Bee Illustrated

Pre7amer who blogs at Pre 7’ame’ers Blog

Ascofu who blogs at Ascofu at Work

Antwarogue who blogs at Rogue Blog

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Walabataji Express

First things first, definitions:

Walabataji- athletes: it is a combination kalenjin and swahili, broken down as follows

“wa” the Swahili prefix for first person plural
“labat” – run in kalenjin
“ji” – the Swahili suffix to indicate a doer of something, in this case a doer of the running (a runner)

Express after the famous Eldoret Express

We coined this word back in high school to refer to the student athletes who used to go for training daily, except on Sundays. They were our express mail, just like the postal services but unlike the Post office, we could get our replies either on the same day or the next day..

I studied in one secondary school, which we liked calling “High” just because we were the best performers in the district. Close to us was our brother school, a real high school, not like us. One thing that we had in common is the ability to produce the best athletes that make news in the dailies and the international media.

Half the girls in our school had boyfriends in the brother school and that’s when the use of the Walambataji Express started. I can’t exactly say how it started but one thing for sure, it picked up pretty fast until the teachers we wondering what were happening to our mails. The advantages of the Walambataji Express included

• It was free- there was no need for stamps
• It was reliable- You are sure that the letter got to the recipient
• You get the replies as soon as possible

What you needed to do is to ensure that you have given out the letter, usually called the missive to the athlete just before they depart for their morning run, at 6 am or a quarter to six or you should give it to them just in the evening at six or half past six.

It was an interesting way of communicating to and fro, because the athletes from our school would meet those from the brother school, since most of them were trained by the same coach.

I got to hear about this service in a funny way. One morning we collided with my bedmate as she was literarilly storming out of the room to hand out the missive, for her most recent crush. I asked her later when she told me about the Walambataji express. I said I would use it one day, but never did. I don’t know if those I left behind are using it or not, whichever way, it served us well.

Mimi Wako Mwenziyo

Nipe nikupe, maneno hayo usemayo,
usinitumie sin’tupe, mimi wako mwenziyo,
sijifananishe kupe, mambo hayo tia moyo,
kwa wakati simo, sijitafutie mwingine.

kwa wakati simo, sijitafutie mwingine,
mapenzi mambo muhimo, sifananishe na jingine,
kwa yote yaliomo, sitataka mwingine
sijitie simanzi, moyo wangu ni wako.

sijitie simanzi, moyo wangu u wako,
mtima una mapenzi, kokote uliko,
njoo kwangu unienzi,maana sitoki kwako,
Kwa sherehe na shangwe, tukuwaambie wazee.

 

Find More Writings by Bee Illustrated here

Sometimes

Sometimes I force them
Sometimes they flow easily
Sometimes they do not flow at all

They make you happy,
At times they make you sad
They make you angry
They make you resigned

Sometimes they slip out
Sometimes I force them to stay put
Sometimes they cheer someone up

These thoughts of mine
They are a pain
They are a joy
They are what they are
My thoughts

Find More Writings by Bee Illustrated here